UCU Digital Institutional Repository(UCUDIR)

Welcome to the Uganda Christian University Digital Institutional Repositoy (UCUDIR). This is the University's official Institutional Repository. It aims to collect, preserve and showcase the intellectual output of staff and students of UCU. This growing collection of research includes peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, working papers, theses, and more.

  • The Repository ingests documents, audio, video, datasets and their corresponding Dublin Core metadata
  • The aim is to open up this content to local and global audiences, with have optimized well for Google Scholar so your items here shows up on Google Scholar searches
  • we also issue permanent urls and trustworthy identifiers, including optional integrations with handle.net and DataCite DOI

Not Registered? click here to Register or or if already registered: Click To submit your Item

For more information visit any UCU Library branch

 

Communities in UCUDIR

Select a community to browse its collections.

Now showing 1 - 8 of 8

Recent Submissions

Item
Nurturing the Future: Examining Parenting Influence on Youth Development - A Case Study of Arua Central Division, Arua City
(Uganda Christian University, 2024-05-08) Patrick Obiga Anyule
This study investigated the influence of parenting practices on youth development in Arua Central Division, Arua City, Uganda, a region grappling with rising cases of youth delinquency and social challenges. The main objective was to explore how parenting practices affected the holistic development of youth within the specific socio-cultural context of Arua Central Division. Different sets of data were gathered from 74 respondents, including parents and youths, through Survey Questionnaires, Interviews, and Focus Group Discussions. Analysis of the data revealed authoritative parenting as the dominant style, significant parental influence on youth career choices, and poverty/low-income levels, illiteracy, and high cost of living (arising mainly from exorbitant taxes) as major challenges faced by parents. These challenges contributed to school dropout, peer pressure, and frustration among the youth, leading to negative behaviors such as substance abuse, idleness, prostitution, and robbery, among others. The consistent parental support in academic and career matters across the globe, as well as in Arua Central Division, underscored the universal importance of parental involvement in fostering positive educational outcomes. Recommendations include implementing poverty alleviation programs, offering adult education to improve parental literacy, organizing parenting workshops, providing family counseling services, and advocating for policies supporting low-income families. These findings contribute to understanding the dynamics of parenting and its impact on youth development, offering insights for interventions and policy formulation to address the challenges faced by parents, families, and youth in Arua Central Division.
Item
Adoption of E-learning in Selected Schools of Library and Information Science (Lis) in Uganda
(Uganda Christian University, 2024-05-16) Joseph Wejuli
This research examined the adoption of e-learning in LIS education schools by comparing e-learning adoption at EASLIS and UCU to determine whether there were any significant differences and to propose strategies to improve their adoption rates of e-learning. The research's objectives were: i) to compare the e-learning initiatives at EASLIS and UCU; ii) to compare the degree of user-adoption of e-learning at EASLIS and UCU; iii) to examine the challenges affecting the adoption of e-learning at EASLIS and UCU; and iv) to propose strategies to increase the adoption of e-learning at EASLIS and UCU. The research design was a comparative case study with a mixed-methods research approach. The sample size consisted of 22 study participants who composed the entire target population. The data collection methods used were questionnaires and structured interviews. The research findings revealed that both LIS education schools had e-learning initiatives, however, UCU had less management support and did not have a governing committee to manage e-learning. It was further revealed that the degree of user-adoption of e-learning in both LIS education schools was high, however, there were limitations such as the need for staff to get their own Zoom licences at UCU and the low compliance levels among staff at EASLIS. It was also revealed that the LIS education schools suffered from limited funding, high connectivity costs and intellectual challenges, among others. UCU was also understaffed and staff at EASLIS showed low complacency levels and were overworked. The study concluded that there was a need for UCU to install an e-learning governing committee and to lobby for more management support. It was also concluded that both LIS education schools needed to train their staff in delivering engaging e-learning content. It was further concluded that both LIS education schools had to lobby for more financial support. Lastly, EASLIS had to improve staff compliance levels and UCU had to recruit more staff. For EASLIS, the study recommended increasing sensitisation levels to enhance staff compliance and scheduling content delivery as a strategy to reduce staff workloads. For UCU, the study recommended hiring more staff to fill the human resource gaps, purchasing Zoom licences for staff to limit them from using personal resources, lobbying for management support and installing an e-learning government committee. For both EASLIS and UCU, the study recommended lobbying for more funding and conducting staff training to improve their capacity to deliver engaging content.
Item
Satisfaction With Clinical Care and Associated Factors Among Palliative Care Patients at Bukavu Provincial General Reference Hospital, Democratic Republic of Congo
(Uganda Christian University, 2024-05-15) Guillain Lwesso
Background: Patient satisfaction is a vital indicator of quality of healthcare. This study assessed the level of patient satisfaction with palliative care services and associated factors among adult HIV-positive patients receiving palliative care services at HPGRB . Methods: A cross-sectional study enrolled 376 adult HIV-positive patients receiving palliative care at HPGRB using simple random sampling. A structured questionnaire assessed socio-demographics, health facility factors, and satisfaction using 18 Likert scale questions. Satisfaction was defined as a score above the median of possible scores. logistical regression was used to identified factors associated with satisfaction among patients receiving palliative care services. STATA v17.0 was used to analyze the data. Results: The satisfaction level was 59.3% (95% CI: 54.3, 64.2). Being female (aPR 2.0, 95% CI: 1.7, 2.9), employed (aPR 3.5, 95% CI: 2.1, 5.9), and aged ≥50 years (aPR 6.3, 95% CI: 2.5, 13.9) were associated with higher satisfaction. Being non-Catholic (aPR 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2, 0.6) and waiting >3 hours (aPR 0.5, 95% CI: 0.4, 0.6) predicted lower satisfaction. Conclusion: Satisfaction with palliative care at HPGRB is suboptimal. Targeted quality improvement initiatives focusing on waiting times, staff interactions, and expectations of non-Catholic patients could significantly improve satisfaction which would ultimately improve the quality of care.
Item
Mobilization of Ugandan Diaspora for National Development: A Case Study of Ugandans in Zambia
(Uganda Christian University, 0024-03-29) Joshua Ashaba
This study investigated the mobilization of Ugandans in diaspora for national Development using a case study of Ugandans in Zambia. The specific objectives of the study were to: assess how existing mobilization mechanism of Ugandans in Zambia influence their participation in national development, assess how awareness of the role of foreign Mission in Tanzania affect the mobilization of Ugandans in Zambia to participate in National Development, find out how inclinations (social, economic and professional) of Ugandans in Zambia affect their mobilization to participate in National Development, assess how leadership structure of Ugandans in Zambia affect their mobilization to participate in National Development. The study adopted a case study approach so as to provide an opportunity for an in-depth study of particular stake holders in the mobilization and foreign mission of Ugandans in diaspora. Data was obtained, analyzed and a meaningful generalization was made with in Uganda in both quantitative and qualitative measures. The study sample was drawn from a population of 125 participants who included Ministry of Foreign & Internal Affairs officials 10, Foreign Mission in Tanzania 15 and Ugandans in Zambia 100. The sample size was Ministry of Foreign & Internal Affairs officials 10, Foreign Mission in Tanzania 14, Ugandans in Zambia 80 and the total was 104. The study applied questionnaires and interviews as instruments of data collection. This research adopted thematic analysis to classify and interpret the gathered data. The major finding from this study show that Ugandans in Zambia are not effectively mobilized to participate in national development. The mobilization mechanism, awareness of the role of foreign Mission in Tanzania, Social, Economic and Professional inclinations among Ugandans in Zambia and leadership structure of Ugandans in Zambia have limited the participation of Ugandans in Zambia towards national development. The existing mobilization mechanism of Ugandans in Zambia limit their participation in national development because; There are problems in mobilizing Ugandans in the diaspora (73%). These create gaps that hinder their effective mobilization to participate in national development. Ugandans in Zambia are not mobilized through a registered and recognized association. The existing associations that unite Ugandans in Zambia are not legally registered (92%). Although Ugandans in Zambia are registered in a diaspora association (79%). Many Ugandans in Zambia are not aware of the legal status of these associations, which limit their mobilization to participate in national development. Uganda has no diaspora mobilization strategy (50%), that is Uganda lacks a clear known diaspora mobilization policy to guide and mobilize Ugandans in the diaspora to participate in national economic development. The diaspora associations in Zambia do not hold regular mobilization meetings to enable Ugandans in Zambia to know how to participate in national development (62%). There is no investment plan to support potential Ugandans in Zambia to invest in Uganda (62%). There are no annual home coming visits organized to show how Ugandans in the diaspora can spot investment opportunities in the country (63%). On a positive note the diaspora in Zambia remit funds to Uganda. They send funds to Uganda to support their families and therefore contribute to national economic development (92%), a practice that needs to be promoted. Ugandans in Zambia have an association through which they are mobilized for national development (100%) something worth nurturing. Ugandans in Zambia are aware of the existence and mandate of the Foreign Mission in Tanzania (62%). Ugandans in Zambia collaborate with the Foreign Mission in Tanzania on their diaspora issues (54%). Knowledge about Ugandan diaspora is not sufficient to foster collaboration (92%). Ugandans in Zambia are not registered with their Foreign Mission in Tanzania (100%). Therefore, they cannot be traced easily and mobilized for national development and response emergence. The Ugandan mission in Tanzania serves a large geographical area which compromises its effectiveness (84%). The cost to reach the Uganda mission in Tanzania from Zambia is a limiting factor (92%). Therefore, many Ugandans are burdened by distance and transport costs to reach the Ugandan mission in Tanzania. There are immigration limitations between Tanzania and Zambia that prevent Ugandans in Zambia to contact the Ugandan Mission in Tanzanian (67%). Diaspora Services Department (DSD) in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has limitations when handling diaspora issues They have technical, logistical and human capacity to comprehensively handle diaspora challenges (63%). There is little information is known about Ugandans in Zambia (100%). There is no attached mission agency that mobilizes Ugandans in Zambia (62%). Ugandans in Zambia have means through which they send money to Uganda to support in national development (85%). They send money to their relatives and for other development projects, from which government taps money in form of VAT and other taxes from purchase of goods and services. Ugandans in Zambia are fully informed about the developments taking place in the country (67%). There are strong social ties between Ugandans in Zambia (54%). However, Uganda lacks clear statistics of the Ugandans in Zambia (85%). Ugandans in Zambia feel neglected economically and socially (85%). Uganda diaspora in Zambia have a negative attitude towards the development that is taking place in the country (80%). There is no good economic network among Ugandans in Zambia (69%). There exists no well-known professional bond between Ugandans in Zambia (48%). Ugandans in Zambia have an active association that brands Ugandans in Zambia (79%). Ugandans in Zambia are a sources of investment capital to Uganda (54%). Ugandans in Zambia have a leadership structure through which they are effectively mobilized (54%). Ugandans in Zambia are eager to associate with one another (73%). However, the leadership structure of Ugandans in Zambia limit diaspora mobilization to participate in National Development in the following ways; The diaspora leadership in Zambia is not as strong as in other parts of the world (61%). Leadership is a challenge in the mobilization of Ugandans in Zambia (52%). The Diaspora Services Department (DSD) at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs does not effectively execute its full mandate of mobilizing Ugandans in Zambia (92%). Government does not actively support the economic integration of Ugandan nationals in Zambia (69%). Uganda government does not fully engage Ugandans in Zambia to participate in national development (92%). Leaders of Ugandans in Zambia do not encourage them to productively contribute to national development (58%). In answering the practical question of how can Ugandans in Zambia be effectively mobilized to participate in National Development, based on the research findings, the research makes the following recommendations; The existing mobilization mechanism can be improved to enable Ugandans in Zambia participate in national development in the following ways; Ugandans in Zambia should be mobilized through a registered and recognized association. The existing associations that unite Ugandans in Zambia should be legally registered. The Ugandans in Zambia who are registered in a diaspora association should be sensitized and made aware of the legal status of these associations. Uganda should develop a diaspora mobilization strategy, that is Uganda should have a clear known diaspora mobilization policy to guide and mobilize Ugandans in the diaspora to participate in national economic development. The diaspora associations in Zambia should hold regular mobilization meetings to enable Ugandans in Zambia to know how to participate in national development. There should be an investment plan to support potential Ugandans in Zambia to invest in Uganda. There should be annual home coming visits organized to show how Ugandans in the diaspora can spot investment opportunities in the country. Government should promote and appreciate a system that acknowledges the diaspora in Zambia that remit funds to Uganda. Thank them for sending funds to Uganda that support their families and contribute to national economic development. Ugandans in Zambia should nurture the association that mobilizes them for national development. The Ugandan foreign mission in Tanzania should conduct more sensitization awareness missions to Ugandans in Zambia on its existence and mandate. More collaboration efforts between Ugandans in Zambia and the Foreign Mission in Tanzania on their diaspora issues.
Item
Promotional Communications and Students’ Decision to Join Private Universities: A Case Study of Kumi University
(Uganda Christian University, 2024-05-15) John Khaukha
The main purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of promotional communications on students’ decision to join private universities in Uganda, taking Kumi University as one of the private universities in Uganda focusing on establishing the influence of online promotional communications, offline promotional communications and other factors on students’ decision to join Kumi University. This study employed a descriptive research design aimed at describing the relationship between variables. The sample size of the research was comprised of 263 respondents from a total population of 846 Kumi University’s selected students covering three years: Academic Years (AYs) 2017/18, 2018/19 and 2019/2020. The investigator successfully obtained data from 237 participants out of the targeted sample of 263 respondents. This represents an 89.8% response rate. From the research findings, it is evident that promotional communications pose a significant effect on students’ decision to join private universities, but given the setting of Kumi University, and the findings in this study indicates that these strategies have not been well utilized. The findings also show that besides promotional communications, other factors play a vital role in influencing students to join the university. The researcher, therefore, recommends the university to step up a lively and up-to date online presence, set up a vibrant department of marketing and adopt a Marketing Information System such as the University Marketing System. Further, a comprehensive survey should be carried out on students to discover the best strategy the university can use to increase the number of students in each of its intakes.
Item
Facebook as a Corporate Communication Tool: A Case Study of the Church of Uganda
(Uganda Christian University, 2024-05-15) Ivan Naijuka
The study aimed at examining the contribution of Facebook as a tool of corporate communication and is a case study of the Church of Uganda (Namirembe, Kampala and Mukono dioceses). The study was guided by objectives which included: investigating how the Church of Uganda uses Facebook for corporate communication, establishing the effectiveness of Facebook as a corporate communication tool for the Church of Uganda, examining the opportunities related to the use of Facebook in corporate communication and examining challenges related to the use of Facebook in corporate communication in the Church of Uganda. The study was carried out using a case study research design where qualitative research approach was used. Data was collected using interviews and focus group discussions and during the data collection, purposive sampling methods was used as the sample size of 28 staff from Namirembe, Mukono and Kampala Dioceses of the Church of Uganda was used. The findings of the study indicate that to a large extent, the use of Facebook in the three dioceses has been effective in corporate communication because of the positive feedback received from the users and followers of the Facebook pages of these dioceses. Finally, it can be concluded that there are several opportunities related to the use of Facebook for corporate communication like enabling the dioceses to form alliances with prospective partners locally and abroad and allowing a two-way communication between the institution and its stakeholders. The study revealed that challenges related to the use of Facebook for corporate communication include limited time and resources to create these pages and running them constantly, limited skills in creating and running the Facebook pages effectively, negative feedback as well as trust, privacy and security issues involved in the use of Facebook. Finally, the study recommended that institutions like the Church of Uganda need to invest heavily in terms of time and resources when it comes to setting up and running these Facebook pages. The study also recommends the need to offer training to the staff members tasked with handling these Facebook pages to ensure that they have the right skills of doing so.
Item
Analysing the Role of Public Relations in Service Delivery by Local Governments: The Case of Gulu District Local Government in Northern Uganda
(Uganda Christian University, 2024-05-15) James Onono Ojok
The study analyzed the role of public relations in the delivery of public services under the Gulu district local government. The Excellence theory of Grunig and Hunt (1984) and Roger’s Diffusion theory of innovation (1962) informed the analytical framework of this study. In the case of Gulu district local government, the study used both qualitative and quantitative approaches where 243 respondents were sampled using purposive and convenience sampling to select the participants. The study found out that Gulu district local government had access to eleven Frequency Modulation Radio stations that they normally use to communicate public goods and services to the community in Gulu district. The study also found that there was an increase in hand washing practice because of involving the community through sensitization using different communication platforms. The study concluded that most programs under study never had a communication feedback strategy built in them to support the beneficiaries in the community to give their feedback on a particular program, therefore, the study recommended that Gulu district local government should develop a feedback communication strategy for all public goods and services as embedded under the water and road sector related activities which provides feedback to the district and community on areas which needs improvement especially through the water source committees and Community-Based Labour Intensive Model of Road maintenance that keeps communication alive even after a program or project is achieved. The implication of this study in public relations is that when PR in local government or any entity has deliberate feedback mechanisms embedded in all programming, the input of the community, beneficiaries on the services or goods provided to them as end users could support service delivery if the service providers (local government) give an action respond on the feedback of the end users (community). The study agreed that through this approach, public relations can improve service delivery in any setting in local government.
Item
Front Desk Management, Impression and Reputation Management in Regulatory Agencies in Uganda: A Case of Uganda National Bureau of Standards
(Uganda Christian University, 2024-05-13) Saul Waigolo
The study established how the first impression at the front desk affects the reputation of an organization. It assessed how front desk management affects impression, the relationship between front desk, first impression and reputation and the strategies to improve front desk management. The study adopted the Impression Management Theory of Erving Goffman (1959), which explains how social interactions can influence one’s perception about a person, group, organization, object or event. This study used a mixed research approach (qualitative and quantitative), a sample size of 131 respondents was selected from a population of 160 using of Krejcie & Morgan’s table and a response rate of 90.8% was obtained after distribution of the research instruments and interview. A survey that included general demographic characteristics, factor analysis and linear regression were conducted for the analysis. The results show that when clients get first impression at the front desk, they develop positive perceptions about the organization and there is a positive relation between front desk staff and the client through verbal or nonverbal communication which builds the reputation of an organisation. The researcher recommended that organisations should employ the right and qualified people at the front desk, provide information about the organization to the front desk, develop a feedback mechanism to frequently hear from the clients, also have strategies of motivating the existing front desk staff in order to have a positive attitude of the front desk staff and retain the experienced staff, frequently train them on the practices and policies of the organisation.
Item
Investigating the Significance of Orality and Literariness in Timothy Wangusa’s Novels: ‘Upon This Mountain’ and ‘Betwixt Mountains and Wilderness’
(Uganda Christian University, 2024-05-13) Norah Adeke
This study delves into the profound significance of orality and literariness within Timothy Wangusa's captivating novels, namely "Upon this Mountain" and "Betwixt Mountain and Wilderness." It explores how these literary elements play a pivotal role in elevating aesthetic experiences while simultaneously shedding light on historical contexts and power dynamics during the postcolonial era. The primary objectives of this study encompass a meticulous analysis of Wangusa's masterful incorporation of orality, a critical evaluation of his adept utilization of literariness, and an examination of how these carefully interwoven elements contribute to the vivid portrayal of cultural and historical themes within the selected novels. To achieve these objectives, the researcher employed a qualitative analysis approach, with a specific focus on Wangusa's novels that prominently exhibit the captivating elements of orality and literariness, placing particular emphasis on the two aforementioned literary works. With remarkable skill, Wangusa seamlessly integrated various aspects of orality, including captivating recitations, thought-provoking proverbs, and engaging oral narratives. Additionally, he employed a wide array of literary devices such as powerful similes, evocative metaphors, and thought-provoking irony to enrich the narrative experience. Furthermore, this study draws attention to the rich and vibrant tradition of the Bamasaaba people, specifically emphasizing the profound importance of imbalu traditional ceremonies during the advent of White rule. This cultural context adds depth and significance to the exploration of orality and literariness within Wangusa's works. The compelling findings of this study underscored the undeniable impact of Wangusa's adept utilization of orality and literariness. These elements effectively contribute to the creation of profound aesthetic experiences for readers, while simultaneously portraying historical contexts and power dynamics within the postcolonial era. The comprehensive collection and meticulous analysis of data strongly validate the researcher's objectives, solidifying the significance of orality and literariness in Wangusa's novels and their ability to captivate readers and illuminate historical realities.
Item
Legal and Regulatory Framework for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production in Uganda: “Lessons Learned and Future Perspectives”
(Uganda Christian University, 2024) Rebecca Akello
The discovery of significant oil reserves in Uganda's Albertine Graben region in 2006 presents a tremendous opportunity for economic growth and energy security in Uganda. However, the success of the oil and gas industry hinges on a robust legal and regulatory framework that ensures responsible and sustainable resource extraction. This study provides an analysis of Uganda's evolving legal landscape concerning oil and gas activities, drawing insights from past experiences and projecting future perspectives. The examination begins with a historical overview, tracing the development of Uganda's oil and gas sector and analysing key legislative measures, regulatory institutions, and policy initiatives. It assesses the effectiveness of existing frameworks in governing exploration, extraction, and revenue management, while also addressing implementation challenges and gaps. By examining the experiences and challenges faced by Uganda in establishing this framework, valuable lessons can be learned to better prepare the nation for emerging trends, technological advancements, and environmental concerns. On the basis of the legal and regulatory regime, Uganda can draw from the experiences of nations that have more mature legal and regulatory frameworks and adopt best practices from them. Through comparative analysis and case studies, this study elucidates the lessons derived from Uganda's regulatory journey in the oil and gas sector. In addition, through identifying the successes and shortcomings of the existing framework, stakeholders can gain insights to enhance its effectiveness and make recommendations for laws and regulation going forward. Furthermore, this study explores the future trajectory of Uganda's oil and gas industry, considering emerging trends, technological advancements, and global energy dynamics. Through anticipating future challenges and aligning with international best practices, Uganda can position itself as a responsible and attractive destination for oil and gas investments and at the same time be in a position of safeguarding environmental integrity and promoting socio-economic development.