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dc.contributor.authorBakanda, Celestin
dc.contributor.authorBirungi, Josephine
dc.contributor.authorMwesigwa, Robert
dc.contributor.authorFord, Nathan
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Curtis L.
dc.contributor.authorAu-Yeung, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorChan, Keith
dc.contributor.authorNachega, Jean B.
dc.contributor.authorWood, Evan
dc.contributor.authorHogg, Robert S.
dc.contributor.authorDybul, Mark
dc.contributor.authorMills, Edward J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-25T14:44:20Z
dc.date.available2018-07-25T14:44:20Z
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.identifier.citationBakanda, Celestin, Birungi, Josephine, Mwesigwa, Robert, Ford, Nathan, Cooper, Curtis L., Au-Yeung, Christopher, Chan, Keith, Nachega, Jean B. Wood, Evan, Hogg, Robert S. Dybul, Mark and Mills, Edward J., 2011. Association of aging and survival in a large HIV-infected cohort on antiretroviral therapy.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11951/302
dc.descriptionThe study examines if there is a significant difference in survival between elderly (>50 years) and nonelderly adult patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Uganda between 2004 and 2010.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine if there is a significant difference in survival between elderly (>50 years) and nonelderly adult patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Uganda between 2004 and 2010. Design: Prospective observational study. Methods: Patients 18–49 years of age (nonelderly) and 50 years of age and older enrolled in the AIDS Support Organization Uganda HIV/AIDS national programme were assessed for time to all-cause mortality. We applied a Weibull multivariable regression. Results: Among the 22 087 patients eligible for analyses, 19 657 (89.0%) were aged between 18 and 49 years and 2430 (11.0%) were aged 50 years or older. These populations differed in terms of the distributions of sex, baseline CD4 cell count and death. The age group 40–44 displayed the lowest crude mortality rate [31.4 deaths per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval (CI) 28.1, 34.7) and the age group 60–64 displayed the highest crude mortality rate (58.9 deaths per 1000 person-years; 95% CI 42.2, 75.5). Kaplan–Meier survival estimates indicated that nonelderly patients had better survival than elderly patients (P < 0.001). Adjusted Weibull analysis indicated that elderly age status was importantly associated (adjusted hazard ratio 1.23, 95% CI 1.08–1.42) with mortality, when controlling for sex, baseline CD4 cell count and year of therapy initiation. Conclusion: As antiretroviral treatment cohorts mature, the proportion of patients who are elderly will inevitably increase. Elderly patients may require focused clinical care that extends beyond HIV treatment.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkinsen_US
dc.subjectAntiretroviral therapyen_US
dc.subjectElderlyen_US
dc.subjectHIVen_US
dc.subjectOlder adultsen_US
dc.subjectSurvivalen_US
dc.titleAssociation of aging and survival in a large HIV-infected cohort on antiretroviral therapyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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