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dc.contributor.authorBarageine, Justus Kafunjo
dc.contributor.authorFaxelid, Elisabeth
dc.contributor.authorByamugisha, Josaphat K.
dc.contributor.authorRubenson, Birgitta
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-23T12:09:17Z
dc.date.available2018-05-23T12:09:17Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationBarageine, Justus Kafunjo et al 2015. ‘As a man I felt small’: a qualitative study of Ugandan men’s experiences of living with a wife suffering from obstetric fistula, Culture, Health & Sexuality. Culture, Health & Sexuality Journal ISSN: 1369-1058 (Print) 1464-5351 (Online) DOI: 10.1080/13691058.2015.1089325en_US
dc.identifier.issn1369-1058
dc.identifier.issnESSN:1464-5351
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11951/242
dc.descriptionThe effects of obstetric fistula surpass the individual woman and affect husbands, relatives, peers and the community at large. Few studies have documented the experiences of men who live with wives suffering from fistula. In this study, our objective was to understand how fistula affects these men’s lives. We conducted 16 in-depth interviews with men in central and western Uganda.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of obstetric fistula surpass the individual woman and affect husbands, relatives, peers and the community at large. Few studies have documented the experiences of men who live with wives suffering from fistula. In this study, our objective was to understand how fistula affects these men’s lives. We conducted 16 in-depth interviews with men in central and western Uganda. We used thematic narrative analysis and discuss our findings based on Connell’s theory of hegemonic masculinity. Findings show that the men’s experiences conflicted with Ugandan norms of hegemonic masculinity. However, men had to find other ways of explaining their identity, such as portraying themselves as small men but still be responsible, caring husbands and fathers. The few individuals who married a second wife remained married to the wife with the fistula. These men viewed marriage as a lifetime promise before God and a responsibility that should not end because of a fistula. Poverty, love, care for children and social norms in a patriarchal society compelled the men to persevere in their relationship amidst many challenges.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.subjectObstetric fistulaen_US
dc.subjectMen’s experiencesen_US
dc.subjectSexualityen_US
dc.subjectHegemonic masculinityen_US
dc.subjectObstetric fistula - Ugandaen_US
dc.title“As a man I felt small’: a qualitative study of Ugandan men’s experiences of living with a wife suffering from obstetric fistulaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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