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dc.contributor.authorMatanock, Almea
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Tara
dc.contributor.authorTracy Ayers, Tracy
dc.contributor.authorLikicho, Lilian
dc.contributor.authorWamimbi, Richard
dc.contributor.authorLu, Xin
dc.contributor.authorEmeetai, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorKakande, Celia
dc.contributor.authorMutabazi, Miriam
dc.contributor.authorQuick, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-15T13:56:02Z
dc.date.available2018-11-15T13:56:02Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationMatanock, A., Anderson, T., Ayers, T., Likicho, L., Wamimbi, R., Lu, X., Emeetai, T., Kakande,C., Mutabazi, M., & Quick, R. (2016). Integrating Water Treatment into Antenatal Care: Impact on Use of Maternal Health Services and Household Water Treatment by Mothers—Rural Uganda, 2013. The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 94(5), 1150–1156 doi:10.4269/ajtmh.15-0356en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11951/595
dc.description.abstractTo increase maternal health service use and household water treatment (HWT), free water treatment kits were provided at first antenatal care (ANC) visits and free water treatment sachet refills were provided at follow-up ANC visits, delivery, and postnatal visits in 46 health facilities in rural Uganda. We evaluated the impact by surveying 226 women in the initiative (intervention group) and 207 women who received ANC before the initiative began (comparison group). There was no differences in the percentages of intervention and comparison group women with ≥ 4 ANC visits; however, a higher percentage of intervention group women reported treating their drinking water (31.7% versus 19.7%, P = 0.01), and had free chlorine residual in stored water (13.5% versus 3.4%, P = 0.02) than comparison group women. The intervention did not appear to motivate increased maternal health service use, but demonstrated improvements in HWT.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEpidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Management Sciences for Health, STRIDES for Family Health, Kampala, Uganda; World Vision International, Kampala, Ugandaen_US
dc.titleIntegrating Water Treatment into Antenatal Care: Impact on Use of Maternal Health Services and Household Water Treatment by Mothers—Rural Uganda, 2013en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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